Category Solar system

Solar System Structure
Solar system

Solar System Structure

Structure of the Solar System The Solar System is the region of space over which the Sun has an attraction of gravity. We can imagine it as a huge bubble floating in space. There is an invisible border, which is the place where the solar wind and charged particles go around. Everything that remains within that space is part of the Solar System: the Sun, planets, minor celestial bodies, stardust particles, cosmic rays, and all interplanetary space.

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Solar system

Solar activity

Solar activity Solar activity manifests itself and can be observed in various ways: spots, bumps or flares and solar wind. The sun is an active star. Like all stars, it consumes matter and produces energy. But this energy explosion varies according to the zones and also over time.
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Solar system

Phases of the Moon and eclipses

Phases of the Moon and eclipses The movement of the Moon in its orbit around the Earth causes the Sun to illuminate it differently, depending on the position. This originates the phases of the Moon and, if the three stars are in a straight line, the eclipses. The phases of the Moon determined, since ancient times, the measure of time, while the eclipses were taken as spectacular, magical and transcendent events.
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Solar system

Structure and composition of the Sun

Structure and composition of the Sun From Earth we only see the outer layer of the Sun. It is called a photosphere and has a temperature of about 6,000 ºC, with some cooler areas (4,000 ºC) that we call sunspots. The sun is a star. We can imagine it as a ball or onion that can be divided into concentric layers.
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Solar system

How did the solar system form?

How did the solar system form? It is difficult to specify the origin of the Solar System. Scientists believe that it can be located about 4.650 million years ago. There are some explanations on how our Solar System has been formed. One of the most accepted is the nebular theory formulated by René Descartes in 1644 and later perfected by other astronomers.
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Solar system

The planet Mercury

The planet Mercury Mercury is the closest planet to the Sun and the smallest in the Solar System. It is smaller than Earth, but larger than the Moon. Mercury is part of the so-called inner or terrestrial planets, and has no satellites. It is a very dense planet, the second with the highest density in the Solar System, after Earth.
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Solar system

What is the solar system?

What is the solar system? We live in a planetary system formed by the Sun and the celestial bodies that orbit around it, including our Earth. There are many solar systems in the Universe, but we call this, simply, the Solar System, which is ours for that! Well, in "our" Solar System there is a star, the Sun, which keeps many stars and diverse materials spinning around it under the influence of gravity: eight large planets, along with their satellites, smaller planets, asteroids, comets, interstellar dust and gas.
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Solar system

The Meteorites

The Meteorites The word meteor means "phenomenon of the sky" and describes the light that occurs when a fragment of extraterrestrial matter enters the atmosphere. If the meteor does not completely disintegrate, each fragment that reaches the Earth's surface is called a meteorite. Instead, the word meteoroid is applied to the particle itself, without reference to the phenomenon that occurs when it enters the atmosphere.
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Solar system

The Asteroid Belt

The Asteroid Belt Between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter there is a region of 550 million kilometers in which about 20,000 asteroids orbit. Some even have satellites around them. It is the Asteroid Belt. The asteroids were first discovered theoretically, as was the case with the discovery of Neptune and Pluto.
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Solar system

Jupiter's satellites

Jupiter's satellites 400 years ago, Galileo directed his rudimentary telescope towards the planet Jupiter and saw that three dots that looked like moons accompanied him. I had just discovered that Jupiter has satellites. During the following nights he continued looking and, four days later, discovered another.
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Solar system

Gaseous giant planets

Giant gas planets Light planets or gas giants are located on the outside of the Solar System. They are planets consisting basically of hydrogen and helium, a reflection of the composition of the primitive solar nebula. These gas giants have important meteorological activities and gravitational processes, with a small core and a large mass of gas in permanent convection.
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Solar system

The solar system

The Solar System Among the thousands of stars that make up our galaxy there is a medium-sized one, located in one of the spiral arms of the Milky Way, which has a special interest for us ... Sure! Because we are very close to that star and, in a way, we live from it. It is, of course, our Sun.
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Solar system

The moon is our satellite

The Moon is our satellite The Moon is the only natural satellite on Earth and the only body in the Solar System, in addition to the Sun, which we can see in detail with the naked eye or with simple instruments. The Moon reflects sunlight differently depending on where in its orbit it is, which determines the phases of the moon.
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Solar system

The planet Uranus

The planet Uranus Uranus is the seventh planet from the Sun, the third largest and the fourth most massive in the Solar System. It is also the first that was discovered thanks to the telescope: Herschel found it in 1781. He was named after the Greek god of heaven, Uranus, which means firmament. This titan was the son and husband of Gea, Mother Earth, who had conceived it for herself.
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Solar system

The planet Venus

The planet Venus Venus is the second planet in the Solar System and the most similar to Earth because of its size, gravity, mass, density and volume. But until there; Venus is uninhabitable because of its infernal heat. The Romans named it for its beauty in honor of Venus, their goddess of love, equivalent to the Greek Aphrodite.
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Solar system

Asteroids

Asteroids Asteroids are a series of rocky or metallic objects that orbit the Sun, mostly in the main belt, located between Mars and Jupiter. Some asteroids, however, have orbits that go beyond Saturn, others are closer to the Sun than Earth. Some have crashed into our planet.
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Solar system

Saturn, the planet of the rings

Saturn, the planet of the rings Saturn is the second largest planet in the Solar System and the only one with rings visible from Earth. It is clearly marked by the poles because of the rapid rotation. The name of the planet comes from the Roman god of agriculture, Saturn, father of Jupiter.
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Solar system

The sun is our star

The Sun is our star The Sun is the closest star to Earth and the largest star in the Solar System. It is part of the galaxy we call the Milky Way. Stars are the only bodies in the Universe that emit light. The Sun, that nearby star, is located about 150 million kilometers from Earth and is by far the brightest celestial object we can see.
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Solar system

Earth movements and stations

Earth's movements and stations The Earth's orbit is elliptical: there are times when it is closer to the Sun and others when it is further away. In addition, the axis of rotation of the planet is slightly inclined with respect to the plane of the orbit. At the end of the year it seems that the Sun rises and falls. The apparent path of the Sun is called ecliptic, and it passes over the Earth's equator in early spring and autumn.
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Solar system

The moons of Neptune

The moons of Neptune From Neptune, the Sun is far away, 30 times more than Earth, and only seems a very bright spot. All other planets are between him and the Sun, at enormous distances, so that they are not seen. But Neptune had a surprise. On October 10, 1846, less than three weeks after the discovery of Neptune, astronomer William Lassell discovered that he had a satellite, and shone brighter than the two Uranus satellites known until then.
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Solar system

Kuiper's belt

The Kuiper Belt In 1951 the astronomer Gerard Kuiper postulated that there must be a kind of proto-comet disk, an asteroid belt, in the same plane of the Solar System The Kuiper belt should be past the orbit of Neptune, approximately between 30 and 100 astronomical units.
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